Men's European Volleyball Championship

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Men's European Volleyball Championship
Sport Volleyball
Founded 1948
No. of teams 24 (Finals)
Continent Europe (CEV)
Most recent
champion(s)
 Serbia (2nd title)
Most titles  Soviet Union (12 titles)

The Men's European Volleyball Championship (EuroVolley) is the official competition for senior men's national volleyball teams of Europe, organized by the European Volleyball Confederation (CEV). The initial gap between championships was variable, but since 1975 they have been awarded every two years. The current champion is Serbia, which won its second title at the 2019 tournament held in four countries: Belgium, France, the Netherlands and Slovenia.

History[edit]

The first tournament was held in 1948 with participation of six national teams. Being only participant from Eastern Europe, Czechoslovakia captured gold. The teams from Eastern Europe dominated at the tournament for next four decades. The next two editions held in 1950 and 1951 were won by the Soviet Union (who also won two World Championships in 1949 and 1952). However, in late 1950s Czechoslovakia managed to return at first positions. They captured European gold in 1955 and repeated this success at next edition in 1958 (also winning World Championship in 1956). In 1963, twice runner-up Romania won its maiden European title at the home tournament.

The victory in 1967 marked the beginning of the 20-year era of dominance of the Soviet Union. From 1967 to 1987, Soviet team didn't lose any tournament by winning 9 European titles in a row. The names of leading Soviet players of these times such as Vyacheslav Zaytsev, Aleksandr Savin, Vladimir Kondra, Viljar Loor, Yuriy Panchenko and Vladimir Chernyshyov are known to volleyball enthusiasts all over the world. From 1977 to 1985, Soviet team was coached by Vyacheslav Platonov who led national team to five European titles in a row as well as to two World Championship titles (1978, 1982), two World Cup titles (1977, 1981) and Olympic gold in 1980. The main European rival of Soviet team at these times, Poland (1974 World Champion and 1976 Olympic Champion) was runner-up for the five times in a row (from 1975 to 1983).

Soviet domination was ceased in 1989 when Italy under leadership of Argentinian coach Julio Velasco unprecedentally won their first ever official tournament. Soviet team surprisingly failed to even reach podium after losing to Sweden (hosts) in semifinals and to Netherlands in a bronze-medal match. However, in 1991, in their last participation at the competition, Soviet Union won European title for the 12th time after 3–0 victories over a Netherlands in semifinals and Italy in the final match. Vyacheslav Platonov won European title as head coach for the record sixth time.

Following the Soviet Union's dissolution in December 1991, Italy led by such players as Andrea Gardini, Andrea Giani, Paolo Tofoli and Lorenzo Bernardi became indisputably the best team not only in Europe but also in the world. They won three World Championships in a row (1990, 1994, 1998) and also dominated at European Championships by winning five of the next seven tournaments (from 1993 to 2005). However, ironically they never managed to win Olympic gold. Netherlands who became Olympic Champion in 1996 also managed to win their maiden European title at the home tournament next year. FR Yugoslavia who won Olympic gold in 2000 also became European Champion for the first time at the next-year tournament.

After victory in 2005, the period of Italy's dominance came to end, and more national teams were managed to win their maiden European title. The next tournament was surprisingly won by Spain who managed to beat home favorites – Russia – in a closest 5th-set tie-breaker. In 2009, Poland became European Champion for the first time. The next tournament was won by Serbia for the first time since dissolution of the Serbia and Montenegro (the country which was previously known as FR Yugoslavia). In 2013, Russia (who became Olympic Champion in 2012) finally managed to win their first European title since the Soviet Union's dissolution. The next edition was successful for France who also won their maiden European gold.

The 2017 European Championship took place in Poland. It was won by Russia who defeated Germany in a 5th-set tie-breaker. The 2019 European Championship was co-hosted by Belgium, France, the Netherlands and Slovenia in 2019. Serbia won this tournament after 3–1 victory over Slovenia in the final match in Paris. The co-host countries of 2021 edition will be Poland, Czech Republic, Estonia and Finland.[1]

The 31 European Championship tournaments have been won by nine different nations. Russia have won fourteen times (twelve as Soviet Union). The other European Championship winners are Italy, with six titles; Czech Republic as (Czechoslovakia) and Serbia (one as FR Yugoslavia) with three titles; and France, Netherlands, Poland, Romania and Spain, with one title each.

The current format of the competition involves a qualification phase, which currently takes place over the preceding two years, to determine which teams qualify for the tournament phase, which is often called the European Championship Finals. 24 teams, including the automatically qualifying host nation(s), compete in the tournament phase for the title at venues within the host nation(s) over a period of about two weeks.

Results summary[edit]

Year Host Final 3rd place match Teams
Champions Score Runners-up 3rd place Score 4th place
1948
Details
Italy
Italy

Czechoslovakia
Round-robin
France

Italy
Round-robin
Portugal
6
1950
Details
Bulgaria
Bulgaria

Soviet Union
Round-robin
Czechoslovakia

Hungary
Round-robin
Bulgaria
6
1951
Details
France
France

Soviet Union
Round-robin
Bulgaria

France
Round-robin
Romania
10
1955
Details
Romania
Romania

Czechoslovakia
Round-robin
Romania

Bulgaria
Round-robin
Soviet Union
14
1958
Details
Czechoslovakia
Czechoslovakia

Czechoslovakia
Round-robin
Romania

Soviet Union
Round-robin
Bulgaria
20
1963
Details
Romania
Romania

Romania
Round-robin
Hungary

Soviet Union
Round-robin
Bulgaria
17
1967
Details
Turkey
Turkey

Soviet Union
Round-robin
Czechoslovakia

Poland
Round-robin
East Germany
20
1971
Details
Italy
Italy

Soviet Union
Round-robin
Czechoslovakia

Romania
Round-robin
East Germany
22
1975
Details
Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia
Yugoslavia

Soviet Union
Round-robin
Poland

Yugoslavia
Round-robin
Romania
12
1977
Details
Finland
Finland

Soviet Union
3–1
Poland

Romania
3–0
Hungary
12
1979
Details
France
France

Soviet Union
Round-robin
Poland

Yugoslavia
Round-robin
France
12
1981
Details
Bulgaria
Bulgaria

Soviet Union
Round-robin
Poland

Bulgaria
Round-robin
Czechoslovakia
12
1983
Details
East Germany
East Germany

Soviet Union
Round-robin
Poland

Bulgaria
Round-robin
Italy
12
1985
Details
Netherlands
Netherlands

Soviet Union
Round-robin
Czechoslovakia

France
Round-robin
Poland
12
1987
Details
Belgium
Belgium

Soviet Union
3–1
France

Greece
3–2
Sweden
12
1989
Details
Sweden
Sweden

Italy
3–1
Sweden

Netherlands
3–0
Soviet Union
12
1991
Details
Germany
Germany

Soviet Union
3–0
Italy

Netherlands
3–0
Germany
12
1993
Details
Finland
Finland

Italy
3–2
Netherlands

Russia
3–1
Germany
12
1995
Details
Greece
Greece

Italy
3–2
Netherlands

FR Yugoslavia
3–0
Bulgaria
12
1997
Details
Netherlands
Netherlands

Netherlands
3–1
FR Yugoslavia

Italy
3–1
France
12
1999
Details
Austria
Austria

Italy
3–1
Russia

FR Yugoslavia
3–0
Czech Republic
8
2001
Details
Czech Republic
Czech Republic

FR Yugoslavia
3–0
Italy

Russia
3–2
Czech Republic
12
2003
Details
Germany
Germany

Italy
3–2
France

Russia
3–1
Serbia and Montenegro
12
2005
Details
Italy Serbia and Montenegro
Italy / Serbia and Montenegro

Italy
3–2
Russia

Serbia and Montenegro
3–0
Spain
12
2007
Details
Russia
Russia

Spain
3–2
Russia

Serbia
3–1
Finland
16
2009
Details
Turkey
Turkey

Poland
3–1
France

Bulgaria
3–0
Russia
16
2011
Details
Austria Czech Republic
Austria / Czech Republic

Serbia
3–1
Italy

Poland
3–1
Russia
16
2013
Details
Denmark Poland
Denmark / Poland

Russia
3–1
Italy

Serbia
3–0
Bulgaria
16
2015
Details
Bulgaria Italy
Bulgaria / Italy

France
3–0
Slovenia

Italy
3–1
Bulgaria
16
2017
Details
Poland
Poland

Russia
3–2
Germany

Serbia
3–2
Belgium
16
2019
Details
Belgium France Netherlands Slovenia
Belgium / France / Netherlands / Slovenia

Serbia
3–1
Slovenia

Poland
3–0
France
24
2021[2]
Details
Czech Republic Finland Estonia Poland
Czech Republic / Finland / Estonia / Poland
24

Total hosts[edit]

Hosts Nations (Year(s))
4  Italy (1948, 1971, 2005*, 2015*)
3  Bulgaria (1950, 1981, 2015*)
 France (1951, 1979, 2019*)
 Netherlands (1985, 1997, 2019*)
2  Austria (1999, 2011*)
 Belgium (1987, 2019*)
 Czech Republic (2001, 2011*)
 Finland (1977, 1993)
 Germany (1991, 2003)
 Poland (2013*, 2017)
 Romania (1955, 1963)
 Turkey (1967, 2009)
1  Czechoslovakia (1958)
 Denmark (2013*)
 East Germany (1983)
 Greece (1995)
 Russia (2007)
 Serbia and Montenegro (2005*)
 Slovenia (2019*)
 Sweden (1989)
 Yugoslavia (1975)
* = co-hosts

Medals summary[edit]

Rank Nation Gold Silver Bronze Total
1  Soviet Union 12 0 2 14
2  Italy 6 4 3 13
3  Czechoslovakia 3 4 0 7
4  Russia 2 3 3 8
5  Serbia 2 0 3 5
6  Poland 1 5 3 9
7  France 1 4 2 7
8  Netherlands 1 2 2 5
 Romania 1 2 2 5
10  FR Yugoslavia /
 Serbia and Montenegro
1 1 3 5
11  Spain 1 0 0 1
12  Slovenia 0 2 0 2
13  Bulgaria 0 1 4 5
14  Hungary 0 1 1 2
15  Germany 0 1 0 1
 Sweden 0 1 0 1
17  Yugoslavia 0 0 2 2
18  Greece 0 0 1 1
Totals (18 nations) 31 31 31 93

Participating nations[edit]

Team Italy
1948
(6)
Bulgaria
1950
(6)
France
1951
(10)
Romania
1955
(14)
Czechoslovakia
1958
(20)
Romania
1963
(17)
Turkey
1967
(20)
Italy
1971
(22)
Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia
1975
(12)
Finland
1977
(12)
France
1979
(12)
Bulgaria
1981
(12)
East Germany
1983
(12)
Netherlands
1985
(12)
Belgium
1987
(12)
Sweden
1989
(12)
Germany
1991
(12)
Finland
1993
(12)
Greece
1995
(12)
Netherlands
1997
(12)
Austria
1999
(8)
Czech Republic
2001
(12)
Germany
2003
(12)
Italy
Serbia and Montenegro
2005
(12)
 Albania 10th 11th 13th
 Austria 13th 18th 16th 19th 21st 8th
 Belgium 5th 6th 12th 17th 13th 12th 10th 12th 11th 7th
 Bulgaria 4th 2nd 3rd 4th 4th 9th 7th 5th 5th 10th 3rd 3rd 5th 11th 6th 5th 5th 4th 9th 7th 6th 9th
 Czech Republic See  Czechoslovakia 10th 6th 4th 4th 10th 9th
 Croatia Part of  Yugoslavia 8th
 Denmark 20th 17th 20th
 Egypt 14th 15th
 Estonia Part of  Soviet Union
 Finland 11th 14th 14th 17th 13th 11th 9th 7th 8th 10th 12th
 France 2nd 3rd 8th 8th 8th 10th 14th 8th 10th 4th 8th 12th 3rd 2nd 5th 9th 9th 4th 6th 7th 2nd 7th
 Germany See  East Germany and  West Germany 4th 4th 8th 10th 11th 7th
 Greece 20th 18th 12th 9th 8th 3rd 10th 11th 7th 11th 11th 6th
 Hungary 3rd 7th 5th 2nd 6th 5th 11th 4th 8th 11th 9th
 Israel 10th 11th 12th
 Italy 3rd 8th 9th 10th 10th 8th 8th 10th 8th 5th 7th 4th 6th 9th 1st 2nd 1st 1st 3rd 1st 2nd 1st 1st
 Latvia Part of  Soviet Union 11th
 Montenegro Part of  Yugoslavia Part of  Serbia and Montenegro
 Netherlands 6th 9th 13th 12th 15th 9th 9th 12th 10th 10th 5th 3rd 3rd 2nd 2nd 1st 5th 8th 6th 11th
 North Macedonia Part of  Yugoslavia
 Poland 6th 6th 6th 6th 3rd 6th 2nd 2nd 2nd 2nd 2nd 4th 7th 7th 7th 6th 5th 5th 5th
 Portugal 4th 7th 10th
 Romania 5th 4th 2nd 2nd 1st 5th 3rd 4th 3rd 7th 5th 8th 7th 10th 12th 12th
 Russia See  Soviet Union 3rd 5th 5th 2nd 3rd 3rd 2nd
 Scotland 22nd
 Serbia Part of  Yugoslavia Part of  Serbia and Montenegro
 Slovakia Part of  Czechoslovakia 8th 10th 12th
 Slovenia Part of  Yugoslavia 12th
 Spain 12th 12th 12th 11th 8th 4th
 Sweden 16th 17th 9th 4th 2nd 10th 12th
  Switzerland 19th
 Tunisia 16th
 Turkey 12th 11th 14th 15th
 Ukraine Part of  Soviet Union 6th 9th 7th 12th
Discontinued nations
 Czechoslovakia 1st 2nd 1st 1st 5th 2nd 2nd 6th 6th 6th 4th 5th 2nd 6th 12th 8th See  Czech Republic
 East Germany 9th 9th 4th 4th 7th 9th 9th 6th 6th 9th See  Germany
 Serbia and Montenegro See  Yugoslavia 3rd 2nd 3rd 1st 4th 3rd
 Soviet Union 1st 1st 4th 3rd 3rd 1st 1st 1st 1st 1st 1st 1st 1st 1st 4th 1st See  Russia
 West Germany 19th 15th 18th 16th 11th 11th See  Germany
 Yugoslavia 5th 5th 7th 7th 7th 11th 3rd 7th 3rd 10th 11th 8th 8th 6th See  Serbia and Montenegro
Team Russia
2007
(16)
Turkey
2009
(16)
Austria
Czech Republic
2011
(16)
Denmark
Poland
2013
(16)
Bulgaria
Italy
2015
(16)
Poland
2017
(16)
Belgium
France
Netherlands
Slovenia
2019
(24)
Total
 Albania 3
 Austria 16th 23rd 8
 Belarus 15th 16th 22nd 3
 Belgium 10th 13th 7th 10th 4th 9th 16
 Bulgaria 8th 3rd 6th 4th 4th 6th 11th 29
 Croatia 14th 15th 3
 Czech Republic 16th 10th 16th 13th 7th 13th 12
 Denmark 12th 4
 Estonia 14th 12th 11th 13th 24th 5
 Finland 4th 12th 8th 8th 12th 12th 14th 18
 France 9th 2nd 7th 5th 1st 9th 4th 29
 Germany 5th 6th 15th 6th 8th 2nd 8th 13
 Greece 13th 8th 16th 15
 Hungary 11
 Israel 3
 Italy 6th 10th 2nd 2nd 3rd 5th 6th 30
 Latvia 1
 Montenegro 18th 1
 Netherlands 7th 7th 10th 9th 14th 10th 26
 North Macedonia 17th 1
 Poland 11th 1st 3rd 9th 5th 10th 3rd 26
 Portugal 14th 20th 5
 Romania 21st 17
 Russia 2nd 4th 4th 1st 6th 1st 5th 14
 Scotland 1
 Serbia 3rd 5th 1st 3rd 7th 3rd 1st 7
 Slovenia 16th 15th 9th 13th 2nd 8th 2nd 8
 Slovakia 12th 11th 5th 11th 14th 15th 19th 10
 Spain 1st 9th 16th 15th 10
 Sweden 7
  Switzerland 1
 Turkey 15th 13th 11th 14th 11th 12th 10
 Ukraine 7th 5

MVP by edition[edit]

Most successful players[edit]

Boldface denotes active volleyball players and highest medal count among all players (including these who not included in these tables) per type.

Multiple gold medalists[edit]

Rank Player Country From To Gold Silver Bronze Total
1 Aleksandr Savin  Soviet Union 1975 1985 6 6
Vyacheslav Zaytsev  Soviet Union 1975 1985 6 6
3 Vladimir Kondra  Soviet Union 1971 1981 5 5
Viljar Loor  Soviet Union 1975 1983 5 5
Yuriy Panchenko  Soviet Union 1979 1987 5 5
6 Andrea Gardini  Italy 1989 1999 4 1 1 6
Andrea Giani  Italy 1991 2003 4 1 1 6
8 Paolo Tofoli  Italy 1989 1999 4 1 5
9 Marco Bracci  Italy 1989 1999 4 4
Vladimir Chernyshyov  Soviet Union 1975 1981 4 4
Vladimir Dorokhov  Soviet Union 1975 1981 4 4
Oleg Moliboga  Soviet Union 1977 1983 4 4
Pāvels Seļivanovs  Soviet Union 1975 1983 4 4
Vladimir Shkurikhin  Soviet Union 1981 1987 4 4

Multiple medalists[edit]

The table shows those who have won at least 6 medals in total at the European Championships.

Rank Player Country From To Gold Silver Bronze Total
1 Aleksandr Savin  Soviet Union 1975 1985 6 6
Vyacheslav Zaytsev  Soviet Union 1975 1985 6 6
3 Andrea Gardini  Italy 1989 1999 4 1 1 6
Andrea Giani  Italy 1991 2003 4 1 1 6
5 Slobodan Boškan  FR Yugoslavia
 Serbia and Montenegro
 Serbia
1995 2007 1 1 4 6
Andrija Gerić  FR Yugoslavia
 Serbia and Montenegro
 Serbia
1995 2007 1 1 4 6
Nikola Grbić  FR Yugoslavia
 Serbia and Montenegro
 Serbia
1995 2007 1 1 4 6

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ https://www.cev.eu/News.aspx?NewsID=30060&TagType=0&TagContent=0&ID=0&Paging=0&Sd=1/1/1900&Ed=1/1/1900
  2. ^ "Croatia complete pool of EuroVolley 2021 men host countries". cev.eu. 20 December 2019. Retrieved 22 December 2019.

External links[edit]