Edwin Mullhouse

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Edwin Mullhouse: The Life and Death of an American Writer 1943-1954, by Jeffrey Cartwright
EdwinMullhouse.jpg
First edition
Author Steven Millhauser
Country United States
Language English
Publisher Alfred A. Knopf
Publication date
1972
Media type Print
Pages 305
ISBN 0-394-48009-0

Edwin Mullhouse: The Life and Death of an American Writer 1943-1954, by Jeffrey Cartwright is the critically acclaimed[1] debut novel by American author Steven Millhauser, published in 1972 and written in the form of a biography of a fictitious person by a fictitious author.[2] It was Millhauser's best known novel until the publication of his Pulitzer Prize-winning Martin Dressler in 1997,[1] and according to Patrick McGrath writing in The New York Times it is his best work.[3] Edwin Mullhouse is described by Publishers Weekly as a 'cult novel'.[4]

Plot introduction[edit]

Jeffrey Cartwright plays Boswell to Edwin Mullhouse's Johnson,[1] and writes his biography. Edwin is an "eccentric young show-off who fancied himself something of a literary wonder";[2] he writes a novel at age ten, but dies mysteriously at age eleven.[5]

The biography is divided into three parts:[6]

  1. The Early Years: Aug. 1, 1943 – Aug. 1, 1949: The "pre-literate years" in which Cartwright tells of Edwin's birth and childhood in Newfield, Connecticut including time spent in Kindergarten.
  2. The Middle Years: Aug. 2, 1949 – Aug. 1, 1952: The "literate years" when Edwin attends school; his tragic obsession with Rose Dorn featuring prominently.
  3. The Late Years: Aug. 2, 1952 – Aug. 1, 1954: The "literary years" cover the writing of Edwin's novel Cartoons and his untimely death.

Publication history[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]